Study Reveals that Young Girls who Drink Sugary Beverages get Their Periods Early, Have a Greater Risk of Breast Cancer

Carbonated beverages may put young girls at risk of breast cancer, according to a new study.

Researchers from the Harvard Medical School found that drinking just one-and-a-half cans of fizzy sugary drinks increases their cancer risk by five percent and causes early puberty. The scientists looked at 5,583 girls aged 9 to 14 who drank more than 1.5 servings of sugary drinks a day and had their first period 2.7 months sooner than those who consumed two or less drinks a week, according to The Telegraph.

Drinks with added sugar can increase the concentration of insulin in the body, which turns into higher concentrations of sex hormones, normally associated with early onset of menstruation. Associate Professor Karin Michels wrote in the journal Human Reproduction that the team’s primary concern is about childhood obesity “but our study suggests that age of first menstruation (menarche) occurred earlier, independently of body mass index, among girls with the highest consumption of drinks sweetened with added sugar, according to The Telegraph.

Michels noted that a one-year decrease in age at menarche is estimated to increase the risk of breast cancer by five percent, “thus, a 2.7 month-decrease in age at menarche likely has a modest impact on breast cancer risk,” The Telegraph reported.

The study found that girls who drank 1.5 servings of sugar-sweetened drinks a day were 24 percent more likely to start menstruating a month earlier. The average age of the girls involved in the study who consumed the most sugary beverages was 12.8 compared to 13 years for those drinking the least. At the time of study, none of the girls had started their periods. When researchers adjusted results to take account of BMI, the effect of sugary drink consumption on the age of onset of menstruation was still significant, according to The Telegraph.

Girls who consumed the most soda and sugary drinks were 22 percent more likely to start their first period in the next month compared to girls who consumed the least. Previous research has shown that higher levels of caffeine intake is linked to earlier periods, but the researchers in this study found that total sugar or caffeine consumption did not explain their results. The team found that added sugar was the culprit, The Telegraph reported.

Dr. Michels added: “This research shows that it’s even more important that children switch to water.”

Raw Pet Food Recalled due to Listeria Concerns

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall last week of J.J. Fuds Chicken Tender Chunks Pet Food due to potential Listeria contamination.

J.J. Fuds recalled its Chicken Tender Chunks Pet Food after routine sampling by the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development resulted in a positive result for Listeria monocytogenes, the FDA said in a press release posted on the agency website. The company says it is working with distributors and retailers to properly dispose of any affected product still on freezer shelves. J.J. Fuds also says it is working with distributors and retailers to notify pet owners of the recall and inform them of how to properly dispose of any affected product they purchased. Continue reading Raw Pet Food Recalled due to Listeria Concerns

The FDA is Under Pressure to Regulate E-Cigarettes as More Teens Turn to Vaping for the First Time

FDA Pressured to Regulate E-Cigarettes
FDA Pressured to Regulate E-Cigarettes

The use of e-cigarettes, or “vaping,” is on the rise among teenagers across America.

According to a National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) report, 17 percent of high school seniors said they had vaped at least once a month, compared with 14 percent who admitted smoking traditional cigarettes. Sixteen percent of 10th graders said they had vaped, which was more than twice the number of students who said they had smoked regular cigarettes. Continue reading The FDA is Under Pressure to Regulate E-Cigarettes as More Teens Turn to Vaping for the First Time

Cancer Groups Push FDA to Regulate E-Cigarette Products

Cancer Groups Push FDA to Regulate E-Cigarette Products
Cancer Groups Push FDA to Regulate E-Cigarette Products

E-cigarettes are growing in popularity, so much so that the editors of the Oxford Dictionaries declared “vape” their Word of the Year for 2014. But two of the nation’s major cancer science and treatment groups are calling on the government to regulate the devices and increase research on the health effects of vaping.

In a joint statement, the 35,000-member American Society of Clinical Oncology and the 33,000-member American Association for Cancer Research called on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to conduct new research into the health effects of vaping, and use tobacco tax revenues to help fund studies. The groups also included a lengthy list of recommended actions by state and government agencies, according to Science Insider, which viewed the statement. Continue reading Cancer Groups Push FDA to Regulate E-Cigarette Products

Two Major Cancer Groups Call on the FDA to Research, Regulate E-Cigarettes More Thoroughly

Cancer Groups Call FDA to Research, Regulate E-Cigarettes
Cancer Groups Call FDA to Research, Regulate
E-Cigarettes

Two of the largest cancer science and treatment groups in the United States are calling on the government to start regulating electronic nicotine delivery systems, better known as e-cigarettes, and increase research on the health consequences of vaping as the popularity of e-cigarettes continue to rise.

“While e-cigarettes may reduce smoking rates and attendant adverse health risks, we will not know for sure until these products are researched and regulated,” said Peter Paul Yu, president of the 35,000-member American Society of Clinical Oncology, in a statement obtained by Science Insider. “We are concerned that e-cigarettes may encourage nonsmokers, particularly children, to start smoking and develop nicotine addiction.” The American Association for Cancer Research, which is 33,000 members strong, echoed Yu’s sentiments.

The joint statement calls for more research into the health effects of e-cigarettes and using tobacco tax incomes to help fund studies. The groups want e-cigarette manufacturers to register their products with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to identify the chemicals and amounts of nicotine found in various brands, and to agree to help end teen vaping, according to Science Insider.

The FDA issued a proposal in April 2014 that would require the agency to review e-cigarette products and force makers to stop claiming health benefits until science can offer proof. Under the rule, the distribution of free samples of e-cigarettes and vending machine sales would be banned, and health warnings would be mandatory. The FDA has not yet finalized the rules, Science Insider reported.
Continue reading Two Major Cancer Groups Call on the FDA to Research, Regulate E-Cigarettes More Thoroughly

Pennsylvania and West Virginia Waterways are Being Polluted by Ammonium and Iodide Caused by Fracking

Pennsylvania & W.Virginia Waterways Polluted by Fracking
Pennsylvania & W.Virginia Waterways Polluted by Fracking

Ammonium and iodide are being released into Pennsylvania and West Virginia waterways because of hydraulic fracturing (fracking), a new study shows.

The toxic substances, which were not previously known as oil and gas industry pollutants, can wreak havoc on fish, ecosystems and even human health. Ammonium and iodide are extracted from Marcellus shale along with natural gas and oil during fracking and conventional drilling operations, according to Duke University researchers in a study published Wednesday in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, and viewed by Scientific American. Continue reading Pennsylvania and West Virginia Waterways are Being Polluted by Ammonium and Iodide Caused by Fracking

Researchers say the Liquid Found in E-Cigarettes is Dangerous Even if it Doesn’t Contain Nicotine

Researchers say Liquid in E-Cigarettes is Dangerous
Researchers say Liquid in E-Cigarettes is Dangerous

According to a new study from National Jewish Health in Denver, the liquid used in e-cigarettes significantly increases the risk for viral infections in users, whether it contains nicotine or not.

By taking cells from the airways of young, healthy non-smokers and exposing them to the liquid or vapors from e-cigarettes, researchers were able to determine that inhaling the vapor can damage epithelial cells and increase the risk of infections. The scientists discovered that when they exposed the cells to the liquid or vapors in the lab, it only took 10 minutes for a reaction to occur, according to the National Jewish Health (NJH) website. Continue reading Researchers say the Liquid Found in E-Cigarettes is Dangerous Even if it Doesn’t Contain Nicotine

18 Months After Being Recalled, few Jeeps with Explosive Gas Tanks Have Been Fixed

Few Jeeps w/Explosive Gas Tanks Have Been Fixed After Recall
Few Jeeps w/Explosive Gas Tanks Have Been Fixed After Recall

It has been 18 months since Chrysler recalled Jeeps with potentially explosive gas tanks, but drivers are still being killed in their vehicles and more than 1 million Jeeps remain unfixed.

Bloomberg News reported last week that Clarence Ditlow, executive director of the Washington-based advocacy group the Center for Auto Safety is demanding that Chrysler executives do more to contact the owners of the affected Jeep Liberty and Jeep Grand Cherokee models, which were officially recalled in June of 2013. The Jeeps’ gas tanks can explode if the vehicles are rear-ended. Continue reading 18 Months After Being Recalled, few Jeeps with Explosive Gas Tanks Have Been Fixed

Research Links E-cigarettes to Increased Risk of Lung Infections

Research Links E-cigarettes to Risk of Lung Infections
Research Links E-cigarettes to Risk of Lung Infections

A study published in PLOS One suggests that electronic cigarettes can cause a harmful immune response and increase the risk of lung infections. The study was led by Dr. Qun Wu, a lung disease researcher at National Jewish Health in Denver.

The researchers conducted the study by exposing healthy cells lining the lungs, called epithelial cells, and exposing them to e-cigarette vapor in the laboratory. Exposure to vapor caused an increase in IL-6 proteins, which trigger inflammation, within 10 minutes. This harmful immune response lasted up to 48 hours later.

“Epithelial cells are the first line of defence in our airways,” Wu said, according to Health24. “They protect our bodies from anything dangerous we might inhale. Even without nicotine, this liquid can hurt your epithelial defence system and you will be more likely to get sick.”

“We have provided strong evidence that the liquid used in e-cigarettes, whether it contains nicotine or not, has negative effects on the airways and on the lungs. The problem is, these products aren’t regulated and there are no standards to control how much nicotine or other chemicals they contain. I think e-cigarettes could prove dangerous, especially with long-term consumption,” the authors wrote.

Co-author Dr. Hong Wei Chu, director of the Basic Science Section at National Jewish Health said “The cells showed a strong pro-inflammatory response and the risk of viral infection in those cells rose significantly.” The vapor made the cells more susceptible to infection by rhinovirus, the virus primarily responsible for causing the common cold.

The popularity of e-cigarettes has risen considerably in recent years. Less than 2 percent of adults in the United States had tried e-cigarettes in 2010 but by last year this figure increased 620 percent to 40 million. E-cigarettes are marketed as being a healthier than regular cigarettes and a potential cessation aid, but a growing body of research suggests the risks are greater than advertised.

District Court Judge Clears the Way for Talcum Powder Lawsuit to Proceed

Judge Clears the Way for Talcum Powder Lawsuit to Proceed
Judge Clears the Way for Talcum Powder Lawsuit
to Proceed

A U.S. District Court judge recently denied a motion by Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and Imerys Talc America, Inc., fka Luzenac America, Inc. to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the widower of a woman who died of ovarian cancer. The man alleges his late wife’s cancer was caused by the use of Johnson & Johnson Baby Powder and Shower to Shower (containing talc mined and sold by Imerys) in the genital area.

The Plaintiff alleges that J&J and Imerys Talc America conspired together to perform wrongful acts and to misrepresent and suppress the truth concerning the potential risks surrounding the use of talcum powder in the genital area. The Defendants allegedly accomplished this by: Continue reading District Court Judge Clears the Way for Talcum Powder Lawsuit to Proceed